DeCaro Doran

Our firm is a regional leader, offering legal services to individuals and businesses alike. With three offices, we are minutes from the Nation's Capital, Baltimore, Annapolis, and Northern Virginia. We are dedicated to delivering cost-effective and exceptional legal counsel with individualized attention to every client.

LATEST NEWS

DeCaro, Doran is pleased to announce the addition of Matthew A. Ranck as Of Counsel.
 
Matthew A. Ranck has been in the practice of law since 1992. He is barred in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia, and concentrates his practice in Professional Malpractice Litigation, Insurance Defense, and Legal Ethics. Read more...
 
The Partnership is pleased to announce that James S. Liskow is the newest partner at DeCaro, Doran, Siciliano, Gallagher & DeBlasis. Read more...
DeCaro Doran is pleased to announce that James S. Liskow, Mark A. Kohl and Jennifer A. King have been named as 2015 Maryland Rising Stars by Super Lawyers Magazine. This prestigious recognition acknowledges those lawyers who have shown excellence in their practice.  James, Mark, and Jennifer share this honor with only 2.5 percent of the attorneys practicing in Maryland and the firm is very proud of their accomplishment.
 
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LATEST POSTS

In Walton v. Network Solutions, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals held that an advertiser who sent unsolicited email correspondence to email accounts did not violate the Maryland Commercial Electronic Mail Act or the Maryland Consumer Protection Act. Read more...
Maryland’s appellate courts last addressed the topic of social media evidence in Griffin v. State, a 2011 Court of Appeals decision.  Recently, The Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit clarified how statements made in social media may be properly authenticated and admitted. Read more...
What damages can a dog owner recover if their pet is tortiously injured?  That question was recently considered by Maryland's intermediate appellate court in Brooks v. Jenkins. Read more...
Maryland Rule of Evidence 5-411 allows evidence of liability insurance to be used for other purposes, such as proof of agency, ownership or control, or bias or prejudice of a witness.  Often evidence of liability insurance is admitted when the existence of insurance itself is at issue.  For example, if a driver is suing her own insurance company for uninsured motorist benefits, or for first party coverage, such as Personal Injury Protection (PIP).  In those cases, a fact finder would need to know that there is an insurance contract to determine the terms of that contract and responsibility of the parties.  The amount of coverage may still be inadmissible however. - See more at: http://www.decarodoran.com/blogs/the-decaro-doran-blog/january-2015/you-can-t-talk-about-insurance-in-court!-or-can-yo#sthash.b1yif17l.dpuf
The Maryland Rules of Evidence generally prohibit any mention of a person having or not having liability insurance for the purpose of proving whether that person acted negligently or wrongfully.  But can liability insurance ever be referenced in court? Read more...
In Temple v. Mary Washington Hospital, et al., the Virginia Supreme Court held, once again, that they take a very literal view when interpreting court orders.  In doing so, they reminded Virginia attorneys about the importance of preserving appeal rights. Read more...
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Maryland State Bar Association
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